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Sergei Pavlov

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Sergei Pavlov grew up in a small, landlocked town of 10,000 people called Somero in southern Finland. He discovered photography as a teenager and it became his escape from the boredom of his countryside existence. It didn't take him any closer to the artistic community in the beginning -- he started out working as a product photographer in a carpet factory. "Soon I realised that I'm more interested in people than carpets so I moved to Helsinki.” 

The portraits Pavlov created are black and white and seemingly austere in artistic means with the main emphasis on the subject in the interplay of light and shadow. They are seductive and empowering the same time. It's about trust and freedom as well, as Pavlov allows his subjects to fully determine and play out their own identities in front of his lens.

"Most of my portraits have a similar mood to them. I think I just want to portray how I see people in this world: independent, fragile, present and real. Nothing too set-up or pre-arranged. Beauty in ordinary things inspires me a lot. I just take things as they are and try to keep it real and down to earth," 

Sergei is currently based in Paris.

He’s editorial clients include Re-Edition, i-D, SSAW, Leon.

Sergei Pavlov grew up in a small, landlocked town of 10,000 people called Somero in southern Finland. He discovered photography as a teenager and it became his escape from the boredom of his countryside existence. It didn't take him any closer to the artistic community in the beginning -- he started out working as a product photographer in a carpet factory. "Soon I realised that I'm more interested in people than carpets so I moved to Helsinki.” 

The portraits Pavlov created are black and white and seemingly austere in artistic means with the main emphasis on the subject in the interplay of light and shadow. They are seductive and empowering the same time. It's about trust and freedom as well, as Pavlov allows his subjects to fully determine and play out their own identities in front of his lens.

"Most of my portraits have a similar mood to them. I think I just want to portray how I see people in this world: independent, fragile, present and real. Nothing too set-up or pre-arranged. Beauty in ordinary things inspires me a lot. I just take things as they are and try to keep it real and down to earth," 

Sergei is currently based in Paris.

He’s editorial clients include Re-Edition, i-D, SSAW, Leon.